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Courses

Elective Courses

A variety of elective courses are offered each semester and are open to matriculated students and Career Enhancement students. All Master’s degree students are required to complete 8 credits of elective coursework.

Data Structures and Algorithms for Computational Biology
Credits:
Four
Instructor(s): 
Iman Hajirasouliha

This is a unique graduate course, which addresses fundamental data structures and algorithms that are being applied in modern computational biology. The students will focus on algorithmic problem solving and learn several algorithmic techniques. Students will also learn how to design and apply data structures and algorithms to state-of-the-art biology problems such as large-scale genome sequence analysis.

Science of Team Science: Practical Approaches to Working Effectively
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
Bales, Michael

This course provides students with an overview of the emerging research field of the Science of Team Science, with a focus on the knowledge and skills that support effective scientific collaboration. Topics include identifying collaborators, working with individuals from different disciplines, conflict prevention and management, negotiating funding and co-authorship, and evidence-based strategies for effective team leadership. The course will also cover considerations for working with geographically distributed collaborators, including the use of tools and technologies to support remote collaboration.

Fundamental Immunology and Microbiology
Credits:
Part 1 - 5.5, Part 2 - TBD
Instructor(s): 
Ming Li, PhD

This is a two-part series that will provide a fundamental understanding of immunology.  Immunology I will give a comprehensive overview of basic immunology beginning with innate immune responses followed by a study of the main aspects of acquired immunity. Important topics include the following: organization of lymphoid tissues and immune cell migration, cellular and molecular aspects of innate immunity, specific interactions of target cells and T cells that are regulated by the MHC molecule and peptide antigens on the target cell and the antigen specific T cell receptor; generation and molecular structure of B and T cell antigen receptors; signaling through immune receptors; the development of antigen specific T and B cells; and specific roles of some cytokines/lymphokines.  The second part of the series is Immunology II, held in the Spring semester, which focuses on aspects of T and B effector cell generation, immune response generation and regulation in the context of infection, autoimmunity, tumor immunity, and transplant. 

R Programming Workshop
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
Gulce Askin

Students will learn basic programming in the R language with applications in clinical translational research. This course is aimed at teaching students introductory skills needed to import, manipulate, visualize and analyze data. The applied portion of the course will focus on basic bi-variate tests, regression and survival analysis. This course will incorporate the theme of reproducibility in clinical research using features of the R Studio environment, such as R markdown. (Pre-Requisite Required: Biostatistics; Free DataCamp Software required)

Advanced Seminars in Ethics of Clinical Research
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
Inmaculada de Melo-Martin, PhD, MS

This course will introduce students to the ethical dimensions of clinical research. Objectives of the course are as follows: to understand the historic origins of modern research ethics; distinguish the competing ethical obligations of clinical practice and clinical research; appreciate the ethical obligations of the clinical investigator to human subjects; understand the regulation of human subjects research from protocol design to extra-mural oversight; appreciate unique ethical challenges posed by special populations and varying research settings; appreciate ethical challenges posed by different areas of research; consider the difference between regulation and ethics; and how to address novel challenges in clinical research.

Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies
Credits:
Two
Instructor(s): 
Paul Christos, Dr. P.H.

This course will provide trainees with an overview of statistical methods and issues related to the design and analysis of observational studies.  Course objectives are as follows: understand the value of observational study and the background for causal inference; design and write an analysis plan for an observational study; analyze data (using Stata software) with multiple regression analysis to adjust for confounders; review the literature related to large databases to motivate how future studies can be planned; and introduce the concept of meta-analysis for observational studies and their reporting standards. Prerequisite: Introduction to Biostatistics or similar course is required prior to enrollment.

Genomics Workshop
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
Jenny Xiang, BM

This course is designed to give students an overview of genomics technologies including microarray and next-generation sequencing and their applications in the biomedical field leading to design, analysis and interpretation of microarray and next-generation sequencing experiments. The course will cover all the latest techniques and theories and will be organized by a combination of lecture and practical sessions.

Heart-to-Heart: Experiential Learning in Community Outreach
Credits:
One-Two
Instructor(s): 
N/A

The CTSC “Heart-to-Heart” (H2H) Campaign is a multi-institutional service program that reaches out to underserved at-risk communities throughout the metropolitan area by offering free healthcare screenings at local community sites. Volunteer physicians may earn course credit for their participation in these events as part of CTEP’s elective course titled, “Heart to Heart: Experiential Learning in Community Outreach.” Non-MDs may also enroll for credit; assigned roles are experience dependent, and assignments may be to help with registration or ushering duties. To qualify you must be an enrolled CTEP student in good standing, MDs must be a U.S. licensed MD (resident, fellow, attending, etc.), non-MDs must be employed at WCMC or one of the partner institutions. Trainees may earn 1 to 2 elective credits based on the number of sessions attended (2 sessions per credit), on the feedback collected from community attendees, and submission of a brief (1-2 page) write-up in a form of a blog post to be published on the Weill Cornell CTSC blog. The write-up should discuss this experience and how it has impacted the trainee’s research and/or perspective as a clinician. 

Introduction to Global Health
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
Satchit Balsari, MD, MPH

This course will introduce students to thirteen key topics in global health through 1.5-hour weekly seminars. Speakers include global health leaders from academia, policy institutions, and the private sector. The course is intended to be engaging and informative and each seminar is designed to be interactive and discussion-based.

Multi-Cultural Approaches to Community Health and Disease Prevention
Credits:
Two
Instructor(s): 
Laura Robbins, DSW, CSW, MSW

This course will provide an overview of cultural diversity and its impact on the development and implementation of health promotion policies, programs, and health services research.

Pharmacology and Drug Development
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
N/A, eLearning course

This course covers the drug development process from discovery to post-marketing in a 5 modular format.

This course is a prerequisite for Clinical and Translational Pharmacology.

Principles of Clinical Research and Design
Credits:
One
Instructor(s): 
N/A, eLearning course

This course is an introduction to the design of sound clinical research, including randomized trials, epidemiological studies and health economics/outcomes research, covering in a 4 modular format. Course topics covered include: Principles of Clinical Research and Design, Randomized Clinical Trials, Non-Interventional Studies – Epidemiology, and Other Non-Interventional Studies.

This course is a prerequisite for Clinical Trials Design and Analysis.

Qualitative Research Methods
Credits:
Two
Instructor(s): 
Laura Robbins, DSW, CSW, MSW

The course is intended to enable participants to gain a basic fluency with qualitative research methods. The sessions will consistently interweave the theoretical underpinnings of the method with concrete examples of qualitative research. The nexus between qualitative research and traditions in anthropology, sociology, and history will be explored. Most critically, the utility of qualitative methods in research or clinical practice will be examined. Data entry and analysis will also be addressed.

Clinical & Translational Science Center 1300 York Ave., Box 149 New York, NY 10065